Field guide to forest ecosystem classification for the Clay Belt, site region
Read Online
Share

Field guide to forest ecosystem classification for the Clay Belt, site region

  • 954 Want to read
  • ·
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Ministry of Natural Resources in Toronto, Ont .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Forest ecology -- Ontario,
  • Soils -- Ontario -- Classification,
  • Clay soils -- Ontario,
  • Forest soils -- Ontario,
  • Forest plants -- Ontario

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby R. Keith Jones ... [et al.]
ContributionsOntario Tree Improvement and Forest Biomass Institute, Ontario. Ministry of Natural Resources, Canada. Agriculture Canada, Canada. Environment Canada
The Physical Object
Paginationiv, 161 p. :
Number of Pages161
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22145652M

Download Field guide to forest ecosystem classification for the Clay Belt, site region

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Abstract. This guide presents site identification and interpretation information for forest ecosystems of the Cariboo Forest Region. Site identification is based on the biogeoclimatic ecosystem classification (BEC) initially developed by V.J. Krajina and his students at the University of British Columbia and subsequently revised by the B.C. Ministry of Forests.   Forest Ecosystem Classification (FEC) systems have been used in the past mainly for forest management decision-making. FEC systems can also serve an important role for decision-making in other disciplines, such as fire management for both wildfire suppression and prescribed burning operations. FEC systems can provide an important means of identifying potential fuels that may be Cited by: 4. to improve the users' ability to prescribe and monitor site-specific treatments. For Haida Gwaii, this field guide replaces the previously published site identification field guide for the Vancouver Forest Region (Green and Klinka ). The classification presented in this guide differs from previous classifications in several important ways. Field Guide to the Forest Ecosystem Classification for Northwestern Ontario [R. A. Sims et al] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

At a stand level, classifying forest ecosystems based on vegetation, soil and site attributes allows users to recognize similar ecosystem units on the ground and to develop a common understanding of these units (Baldwin and Meades ; Ponomarenko and Alvo ). A Woodland owner’s Guide to forest ecosystem Classification in Nova Scotia How to use the Forest Ecosystem Classification Guide Eastern white cedar vegetation type near Oxford. Identification of forest Vegetation Types, Soil types and Ecosites using the Forest Ecosystem Classification Guide is based on the use of keys. Keys are tools to help File Size: 1MB. This book provides a forest and soil classification system for the commercial forest areas of Manitoba. The classification system consists of 33 vegetation types and 22 soil types, which are identified using keys. Each vegetation and soil type together with pertinent management interpretations is . A field guide for the identification of invasive plants in southern forests. (slightly revised , , and ). General Technical Report SRS– Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. by:

Field guide to the forest ecosystem classification for northwestern Ontario. Sims, R.A.; Towill, W.D.; Baldwin, K.A.; Wickware, G.M. Canadian Forestry Service. Abstract. Forest Ecosystem Classification (FEC) systems have been used in the past mainly for forest management decision-making. FEC systems can also serve an important role for decision-making in other disciplines, such as fire management for both wildfire Cited by: 4.   This ecosystem classification, published and available online as the Field Guide to the Ecosites of Saskatchewan's Provincial Forests, facilitates better integration of forest management disciplines by providing a common ecosystem language that forms an explicit operational framework for resource managers. in their ecosystem function, particularly in regard to soil stability, nitrogen fixation or carbon fixation rates, and dust capture (Williams et al., , Pietrasiak et al., ). Thus, each ecological site will function overall differently depending on which crust communities prevail.